Posts Tagged With: no bad dogs

Risking others in the name of socialisation

Well, it’s been a while and here I am, back with a rant.  A rant about owners of dogs who aren’t really sociable with other dogs.  Now don’t get me wrong, I have no problem with dogs who don’t like other dogs and no problem with those who own and manage them responsibly.  I’ve been there myself after all.  It’s the irresponsible ones I have a problem with.  The owners who are in denial about their dogs behaviour.  The owners who continue to allow their dogs to practise anti-social behaviour towards other dogs.  The ones who make up excuses as to why their dog is the way it is and why they’re doing next to nothing about the problem.  Or paying lip service to what they’ve been advised to do while continuing to do what they’ve always done anyway.

I don’t care what you call the problem.  Aggression.  Reactivity.  Iffy with other dogs.  It doesn’t matter.   Nor do I care why your dog is that way, whether it’s down to a lack of early socialisation, a vicious attack, being bullied by other dogs and feeling defensive.  Again, it doesn’t matter.  Quite simply, if your dog is going to rush up to another dog and attack him, whether with intent or just rude bully boy type tactics, then keep him on the leash.  If your dog is going to attack another dog that comes up to him then you need to take measures to prevent other dogs coming up to him.  Whether that’s walking at odd hours to avoid other dogs, avoiding off leash areas, learning to body block other dogs and teaching yours to stay behind you while you deal with the approaching dog or whatever.  And no, I don’t believe simply sticking a yellow ribbon or vest on the dog is sufficient precaution.  Will it help?  I don’t know, a muzzle and a shouted warning never had much effect so I don’t see how a ribbon or vest will be that effective.  I actually found that saying my dog had a contagious disease worked best to convince others that they should come get their dog.  Made me look irresponsible but meant a hell of a lot less stress for me and my dog.

I’m sure that sounds very harsh and unfeeling to some.  And of course it matters to the owner why the dog behaves the way he does and in some respects it may mean a different approach is needed when it comes to training and expectations.  It just doesn’t change the fact that the dog needs to be managed so he isn’t causing problems for others.  It is not fair on my dog to have a random dog rush across a field to threaten him.  Or even worse, actually hurt him.  It’s not fair on me as his owner to have to deal with the potential fall out from that happening.  People seem to think that if their dog can’t or won’t physically injure another (and just a note, ALL dogs can cause physical harm, I don’t care how small they are or how much bigger their victim is) then it’s okay, there’s no harm done.  Well that’s simply not true.  Very often the physical injuries are the least of it.  It’s the psychological harm done that’s the biggest problem.  The physical injuries are healed up in a few weeks, the mental scars left can last a lifetime.

But, back to the real point of this rant.  I am sick to death of seeing and hearing about people using other peoples dogs as guinea pigs to try to figure out and work on their own dogs aggressive behaviour.  Especially when they’re doing it without the knowledge or consent of other dog owners and just letting their dog interact with random dogs they meet.  Especially when they know that if things don’t play out the way they hope that other dog is likely to get hurt.  Quite honestly, I would be absolutely raging if my dog got hurt by another dog who was allowed to approach him and I found out the dog had done it before.  Not just once but many times.  And that the owner still allowed it to approach other dogs because “sometimes he’s fine”.   Yes, sometimes he’s fine.  But what about all the times he isn’t fine?  The times he hurts or badly frightens the dog you’ve allowed him to approach?  What about the effect that has on the victim?  And on the owner of the victim?

But let’s say you don’t care about the effect your dogs behaviour may have on others, I’m quite sure many don’t.  Let’s focus on your dog.  How does allowing him to practise this supposedly unwanted behaviour help him?  Simple answer, it doesn’t.  The more a dog practises a behaviour the more he’s likely to show it.  So by allowing him to keep approaching and intimidating other dogs you’re simply increasing the chances of him doing it.  Which is supposedly not what you want.  There’s also a good chance that one day he will try it with the wrong dog (or owner!) and end up hurt himself.  Or perhaps you as his owner will end up hurt.  And I’m sure that’s not what you want.  Is it?  I have to wonder sometimes.  Especially with those who used to tell me that my aggressive dog biting theirs might “teach him a lesson”.  No, it wouldn’t have.  Well, it might have done but probably not the lesson they wanted their dog to learn.  And it would have been an expensive one too as Rupert didn’t mess around with all this noise and slobber business.  Hence the muzzle.  Which apparently was an act of cruelty on my part according to many people.  Apparently “such a lovely dog” didn’t need muzzling.  Another comment I got a lot was “oh but he doesn’t look vicious!”  What exactly does a “vicious” dog look like?  I’m sure if Rupert had been a Staffie or a Rottweiler nobody would have questioned the need for a muzzle.

But again, back to the point.  I’m good at wandering off on tangents lol.  Yes, Rupert was aggressive.  I’m not going to dance around describing him as reactive or any of the other words people use to sugar coat it.  Reactive seems an odd word to use anyway, all dogs react to things in one way or another so surely all dogs are reactive?  Rupert was, plain and simple, aggressive towards other dogs.  Yes, I could probably clarify that he was fear aggressive but what would that actually change?  Nothing really, he’d still behave the same way and need working with the same way.  I worked on his issues as best I could in a world where people think it’s just fine to allow their dog to rush up to others uninvited.  Even on the main road at rush hour.  We never purposely put other dogs at risk in order to work with him though.  He was kept on a leash.  He was muzzled.  He wasn’t allowed to go up to other dogs and I did my absolute best to keep other dogs from reaching him.  He learned to go behind me and stay there while I dealt with approaching dogs.  I learned to be more proactive in seeing off approaching dogs and insisting their owners retrieve them.  I also learned to accept that Rupert was who he was.  That much as I might want it he was never going to be a “dog park dog”, the sort of dog who could be taken places and meet all sorts of strange dogs without any issues.  That he needed managing to keep both himself and others safe.

I think perhaps that may be part the problem with so many owners.  They can’t accept that.  They don’t want to accept that.  They want to wave a magic wand and have their dog be exactly the sort of dog they want.   And they want it right now, they don’t want to have to put in months or years of hard work to achieve it.  Adding to that, they’re so often told simply that their dog needs “socialising” which is taken to mean that their dog needs to be interacting with other dogs.  I see a hell of a lot of posts on Facebook and the occasional forum post from people looking for “friendly” dogs to help socialise their adult dog who “can be a bit funny with other dogs” and, perhaps more worryingly, I see a lot of responses from people offering their dogs up as guinea pigs.  I can’t help but feel they’re setting their dogs up to be badly hurt or frightened.  It’s all very well an experienced professional using carefully selected dogs as stooge dogs in situations set up to ensure the chances of anyone being hurt or traumatised is minimal, it’s quite another to have your average dog owner just meeting up with someone and hoping for the best.  Or, as so many seem to do, simply hoping for the best with random dogs and their unsuspecting owners.

I’m sure that to some I’m coming across as a real bitch.  Like someone who thinks any dog who isn’t super friendly and willing to put up with anything and everything should be locked away from the public or put to sleep or something.  That honestly isn’t the case.  It’s the complete lack of concern for others so many seem to have when they have a dog who isn’t particularly friendly that makes me angry.   I have a lot of time for those who have a dog with issues and who are genuinely working to try to solve those problems.  I have next to no time for those who constantly ask for advice and help, see trainers and behaviourists who give them professional advice, and yet continue to put the general public at risk with how they go about it because that’s the easier, more convenient (and usually cheaper!) option than going about it safely.

As I say, I’ve been there with an aggressive dog.  I know how draining and lonely it can be.  How heart breaking it is to have all your progress undone by one thoughtless owner.  I know how it feels to get the sighs and tuts, the disapproving looks and snide comments about vicious dogs being out in public.  I have a lot of respect for anyone who is genuinely working with their dog on this sort of problem.  It’s not easy.  There is no magic wand, no quick fix.  It’s hard work and a hell of a lot of management.  Same for those whose dogs who are fearful but don’t show aggression, so many people don’t see a shut down, frightened dog for what it is that the lack of reaction brings its own problems.  That’s something else I have a problem with actually.  Those who feel their frightened dogs should just “man up and deal with it” and force them to face whatever it is that clearly terrifies them.  I’ve had more than a few try to convince their obviously frightened (usually toy breed) dogs to come up and say hello to my large, bouncy Labrador.  And their embarrassed owners tell me how stupid their poor dog is for being frightened of other dogs, that he needs to grow a pair or something similar.  Same with other fears.  It makes me feel sad for the dog.  Where is the compassion?  The concern for how the dog is feeling?

Anyway, I think I’ll end that there.  For now at least.    I hope I haven’t come across as someone who thinks all dogs should be like Lassie, that isn’t my view at all.  This was inspired by seeing so many posts by people knowingly putting random dogs, and in some cases random children, at risk in order to “socialise” their aggressive/fearful dog.

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No bad dogs, only bad owners

If there is one phrase guaranteed to make me see red it’s the “no bad dogs, only bad owners” one.  Or anything that basically says that all a dogs problems are down to how it’s raised and if you’ve got an aggressive dog then it’s all your fault and you’re a terrible owner.  I hate it.  Absolutely hate it.  Just seeing it written down makes me angry.  Irrationally angry really.  For one, it simply is not true.  For another I can’t describe how it feels to have a dog with issues, to be working on those issues and managing the dog so both the dog and anyone around it is kept safe, only to have some sanctimonious little know it all (not my first choice of words but since my mum reads my blog I’ll keep it clean lol) smugly turn around and basically say it’s all your fault.  Do people have any idea how hurtful that comment is?  Any idea how close I came to showing them just how awful a person I was by giving in to the rage that rose up when those words spewed from their mouth?  Do they not realise how very unfair it is to be blamed for the issues your dog has when those issues have been caused by other people being unable or unwilling to control their own rude or aggressive dogs?  Or children.  Or themselves.  Whichever fits.  Dogs were the issue for Rupert so that’s what I tend to talk about.  Seriously, it is NOT always the owners fault that a dog is aggressive or fearful or doesn’t have good manners.

Let’s look at some of the things that can contribute to creating a dog who reacts badly to certain things shall we?

First, breeding.  There are dogs being bred who quite simply shouldn’t be bred.  Health reasons aside it is thought that traits such as anxiety and fearfulness may have a genetic component.  People simply throwing two dogs together to get puppies to sell to make money aren’t thinking of temperament.  Or health for that matter.  Sure, you can say it’s the owners fault for not going to a good breeder.  But what if the dog is a rescue?  Their own fault for choosing to rescue?

Incorrect socialisation.  Socialisation is a case of quality over quantity in some respects.  People seem to think that simply exposing a dog to things is socialising it.  It isn’t.  Having good experiences with those things is important.  Not going to try to go into the ins and outs of it here, there’s plenty of stuff out there on the internet about socialisation but here’s an article I like http://www.clickertraining.com/node/3953

Bad experiences.  In some cases all it takes is one bad experience to cause long lasting issues that require a lot of work.  Some dogs simply do not bounce back well from them even as adults.  Spencer will shake off an unpleasant incident with another dog, Rupert could not, it took him a good few days to calm back down and in that time he’d be far more on edge than normal.  Spencer seems able to go “yeah, yeah, whatever” at another dog raging at him from a few metres away, Rupert couldn’t.  And again, where Spen is over it almost before it’s happened, Rupert took ages to get over it.  It ruined the rest of his walk if not his entire day.  And bad experiences don’t have to involve aggression.  A young puppy being bounced all over by an over enthusiastic adolescent or mobbed by a group of people all wanting to fuss it at once is probably not having a good experience.  Nor does it need to “man up and deal with it” as many seem to believe.

Punishing the behaviour.  I think it’s perfectly natural for us to go “whoa, no, that is not acceptable behaviour!” and punish a dog whenever it shows aggression.  But doing so does nothing to change the dogs feelings towards whatever it is reacting badly to.  Punish a dog for growling at a child and you may well suppress the growl, stop the dog from doing it.  But that dog is still going to be just as uncomfortable about the child if not more so because it has been punished for showing its discomfort.  There seem to be a lot of people fall foul of bad trainers unfortunately.  It’s easy to know where to look to find a decent trainer if you already know, if you’re the average pet owner however you’re probably not going to have any idea that organisations such as the PPG exist and are probably going to use google or something to find a trainer near you and chances are it’s going to be one of those old school, punish the dog types.  Having done a quick google search myself a certain franchise features heavily in the UK.  As do many “whisperers” and “listeners” who promise very quick results.

There are probably plenty of other things that can contribute to a dog reacting badly to things but this is going to be long enough as it is.  Now yes, you could say that some of these are down to the way the owner has handled the dog.  But still, is it the owners fault?  If you don’t know the history of the dog you have absolutely no idea whether it is a rescue dog that came with those issues.  You don’t know that it has been punished for its behaviour.  You don’t know whether or not it has had bad experiences previously.  You don’t know whether the owner, realising they had problems, called in a supposed professional and knowing no better followed advice that made the problems worse.  Or perhaps they’ve had good advice and are working to rectify the problems they’re having.  It seems a hell of a lot easier to find advice that says hurt or frighten the dog than anything else unless you’re familiar with dog training terminology. Either way, they really do not need someone judging them, telling them it’s all their own fault, that they’re a terrible owner etc.  Your dog lunging and barking and snarling is embarrassing and unpleasant enough without someone who has no clue whatsoever about you and your dog spouting what is often complete and utter rubbish.

Are dogs who react badly to certain triggers bad dogs?  No, they’re not.  But that doesn’t mean that they have a bad owner either.  Please, just think a little before thoughtlessly quoting that awful phrase at them.  One day you may be the one having issues and that phrase may become the red rag to a bull that it is to me.

Apologies for the rant.  I seem to have seen this sentiment all over the place lately and as I say, it just makes me see red.

 

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